fulllogos

Twitter Chat on Mums and Mums-To-Be Mental Health for PND Awareness Week #PNDAW17

It’s important to look after yourself during pregnancy and motherhood. Mums and mums-to-be mental wellbeing is just as important as their physical health. That’s why we’re supporting PANDAS Foundation PND Awareness Week.

Twitter Chat


Sarah Beeson MBE will co-hosting a twitter chat with PANDAS on how we can all take more care of ourselves and support other mums as part of PND Awareness Week 4-10 September. We’ll be focusing on the stress and anxiety women can experience during pregnancy.

Join us on Twitter 8pm Thursday 7 September Follow @NewArrivalBook @Pandas_UK using hashtag #PNDAW17

Competition_FacebookLive28August_SquareAd

Why We Love BabyCup and Your Chance to Win One

Join Sarah Beeson MBE and Amy Beeson as they answer mums and mums-to-be baby questions and chat about weaning on Facebook Live at 8pm on Tuesday 29 August.

Enter To Win

When you ask a question in the comments section on Facebook you’ll be entered to win a pack from BabyCup and a copy of Happy Baby, Happy Family. (UK entrants only).

Weaning_FacebookLive28August_SquareAd

About BabyCup

BabyCup is a mini open cup for healthy sipping from weaning onwards – no lids, spouts or seals. It’s translucent so children can see inside; easy to clean and can go in your steriliser and dishwasher. It’s good for tiny teeth too – with no spout to chew on.

babycup

Sarah’s Tips For Using BabyCup

BabyCup is suitable for babies to use from 4+ months – follow your baby’s lead. Giving them an open smaller cup that fits into the palm of their hand gently gives your baby the opportunity to handle a cup at mealtimes when you start weaning.

Start by getting your baby to cup their hand first and let them explore this new object and get the feel of it – this is a new experience for them. Put a BabyCup intp your hand too and let them copy you.

Pop the BabyCup onto your baby’s high chair tray or place it into your baby’s hand. Don’t comment too much or go over the top if they start using it; calmly wait and see what happens. If they pay no attention to the cup at all, leave it a week or so before introducing it again. You might want to put down a plastic sheet to catch any spills!

Gentle praise is all that’s needed, don’t force it – your baby will get there in their own time. Keep putting the BabyCup on their tray but be patient and let them find it. It’s good to give your baby some decision-making power. They’ll have a preference but you’re giving them the opportunity to choose for themselves without pressure or expectations.

Fill the cup a quarter full with some cooled boiled water (if your baby is under six months). You might want to drink some water yourself from a matching BabyCup and let your baby observe and copy you – cheers!

Your baby will still need their breast milk or formula, so it’s great to use the BabyCup at meal and snack times to compliment their milk feeds in the early days of weaning.

Books_HBHF

About Happy Baby, Happy Family

“There isn’t one perfect way of parenting; every single baby and family is unique. Feeling confident, authentic and positive about your role as a parent is key to building a loving relationship with your child,” says author and former health visitor Sarah Beeson MBE.

“This is the best generation of parents I have ever seen. I’ve never known more mums and dads who are putting their children’s needs first. I want a world filled with happy babies and for mums and dads to see what a fantastic start in life they are giving their children by putting them at the centre of their lives and meeting their emotional needs as well as their practical ones.”

Discover Sarah’s top three secrets of breastfeeding and what the signs are your baby is getting enough milk. How all parents can use feeding time to bond with their baby and instant calming methods to soothe and help your Little One sleep. Weaning your way and an A-Z of solutions to common problems from colic to teething.

Take care of the whole family by understanding the emotional needs of your baby. Discover what life as a new parent is like from your partner’s perspective with advice on sex and relationships from both a woman’s and a man’s point of view.

Nurturing, practical and refreshingly honest that one-size doesn’t fit all and no-one is a perfect parent, Sarah Beeson’s advice is the perfect companion to parenthood. Get your copy now.

Weaning_FacebookLive28August_FBbanner

Join us on Facebook Live at 8pm on Tuesday 29 August and enter to win BabyCup and Happy Baby, Happy Family.

WeaningSuggestion_Dal

Weaning Recipe – Lentils with Butternut Squash

Try this recipe from Mrs Beeson’s Family Cookbook. Suitable from 5+ months 🥄 #weaning

RecipeCard_LentilsWithButternutSquash_FinalVersion

INGREDIENTS

Spilt little orange lentils 60g/2oz, Cubed Butternut Squash 90g/3oz, Butter or Sunflower Oil 30g/1oz and a sprinkle of cinnamon (optional).

METHOD

  1. Heat butter (or oil) in the saucepan.
  2. Add well rinsed and drained lentils to the pan and coat for a couple of minutes until they look shiny.
  3. Add cinnamon allowing it to coat the lentils.
  4. Incorporate butternut squash cubes and mix well.
  5. Cover with water and bring to the boil. Simmer for 20-25 minutes  until the butternut squash is tender and the lentils well cooked.
  6. Drain any excess water and mash up with a fork for younger babies. Leave to stand in a bowl to cool before serving.

Try to only introduce a couple of new tastes a week to start with to give your baby the opportunity to discover each flavour.

More ideas – We’ve got a great choice of early weaning foods for you. See First Stage Weaning Vegetables, Fruits, Cereals & Pulses, Meal Planners and more Recipe Cards for a more little weaning inspiration.

Bon Appétit!

sarah name

 

 

 

Find out more in Sarah’s books.

RecipeCard_PastaWithCheese_FinalVersion

Weaning Recipe – Pasta with Peas & Cheese

Try this recipe from Mrs Beeson’s Family Cookbook. Suitable from 5+ months 🥄 #weaning

RecipeCard_PastaWithCheese_FinalVersion

INGREDIENTS

Pasta 90g/3oz, Peas 60g/2oz, 1 tsp of grated cheese or cream cheese and 1/2 tsp butter.

METHOD

  1. Cook pasta according to timings on the packet.
  2. Cook the peas for 3-4 minutes and mash with a fork for young babies but leave whole for older babies.
  3. Mix peas and pasta together with butter.
  4. Stir in cheese and allow to cool before serving.

Try to only introduce a couple of new tastes a week to start with to give your baby the opportunity to discover each flavour.

More ideas – We’ve got a great choice of early weaning foods for you. See First Stage Weaning Vegetables, Fruits, Cereals & Pulses, Meal Planners and more Recipe Cards for a more little weaning inspiration.

Bon Appétit!

sarah name

 

 

 

Find out more in Sarah’s books.

WeaningSuggestion_MealPlan_Saturday_MashedAvocado

First Stage Weaning – Avocado Mash

Has your baby tried avocado yet? Try this recipe from Mrs Beeson’s Family Cookbook. Suitable from 5+ months and lovely on its own or added to a couple of teaspoons of baby rice or cereal. 🥄 #weaning

WeaningSuggestion_MealPlan_Saturday_MashedAvocado

How to Make Avocado Mash For Your Weaning Baby

1. Scoop 2-4 tsps out avocado and chop into small pieces (keep the rest for yourself and get some good nutrients yourself!)
2. Mash with a fork into a sterilised bowl (do not add anything to it like sugar, salt or honey).

Serve up straight away as the avocado flesh discolours quickly. Increase the amount of teaspoons as your baby develops their appetite.

Bon Appétit!

sarah name

 

 

 

Find out more in Sarah’s books.

WeaningSuggestion_MealPlan_Thursday_ButternutSquashPuree

First Stage Weaning – Butternut Squash Pureé

Has your baby tried butternut squash yet? Try this recipe from Mrs Beeson’s Family Cookbook. Suitable from 5+ months and lovely as a purée on its own or added to a couple of teaspoons of baby rice or cereal. 🥄 #weaning

WeaningSuggestion_MealPlan_Thursday_ButternutSquashPuree

How to Make Butternut Squash Pureé For Your Weaning Baby

1. Chop up butternut squash into small pieces.
2. Gently cook butternut squash in a saucepan using only a little freshly drawn water so it is not too wet when puréed.
3. Mash with a fork or push the softly cooked butternut squash through a plastic sterilised sieve into a sterilised bowl (do not add anything to it like sugar, salt or honey).

You can add 2 tsps of baby rice made into a paste with expressed breast milk or formula if you want to.

You don’t want it to be too solid or runny, so you can always add a little more expressed breast milk, formula or cooled boiled water to make it the right consistency.

Bon Appétit!

sarah name

 

 

 

Find out more in Sarah’s books.

amy_ourcountrynurse_selfie

Who are you today, mummy?

Author and mum Amy Beeson shares her experiences of looking after a child over the summer holidays whilst launching a new book with workingmums

amy_takie_ava_themoathouse_ourcountrynurse

After publishing three books with HarperCollins, running my own business and doing the school run I’ve learnt that women maybe multitaskers but focusing on what you want to achieve most of all each day and feeling fulfilled by small achievements is what success looks like for me. Book sales and client wins are fantastic but they’re intangible and can sometimes leave you feeling a bit flat. Focusing on putting on a great book event one day and then making pancakes with my daughter the next morning feels more real than striving for an end goal since I left the corporate world.

The corporate world is playing catch up; they talk about flexible working but we’re actually doing it.

I did find pregnancy and the return to work challenging because becoming a mum changed me. It changed my relationship with work. I love my job but I’ve got at least three full time jobs (I’m a mum, an author and business owner) but I can’t be all three at the same time, not in the way I want to. I ask myself who am I right now? Over the holidays I was a mum all of the time and an author most of the time, because our new book Our Country Nurse was published and my daughter was off school. There wasn’t much space for client work but that’s OK because most of my clients were away.

For me the biggest challenge is still trying to be present in what I’m doing. Not letting mummy guilt creep in whilst I’m writing and not thinking about emails when I’m with my daughter. And it never gets any easier, it’s never going to not be busy. What I’ve discovered over the last few years is that I need to take responsibility for feeling in control.

I’ve learnt so much by connecting with other mums about what works for them and I’ve discovered that being great at your job doesn’t mean you have to work all the time. I work best in bursts of about two hours – I can get a lot done in those two hours! Then it makes complete sense to go for quick walk, eat something nice, or do some yoga – that’s not slacking; it’s giving my mind and body some sustenance so when I come back to do another two hour burst of writing or client consultations I’m at my optimum.

When you’re in an corporate environment most of the time you have to follow someone else’s rules whether they work for you or not. I get to take a fresh look at each day and ask myself what I need to achieve and how best to set myself up to succeed. Flexible working enables you to pick the time and place that means you always do your best work.

amy_ava_sarah_beeson_ourcountrynurse

My mum is probably the kindest colleague I’ll ever have. Whoever you work with be a kind boss to yourself.

Once my daughter’s in bed if I’m working towards something big I’ll do another few hours on the laptop but I don’t do that all the time because it’s not healthy. During the run up to Our Country Nurse coming out I was working till midnight and we’ve had lots of book events and PR to do.

My mum said to me, ‘Let’s enjoy this. Let’s not miss out the pleasure of seeing our book come out by letting all the thoughts of what we need to do spoilt it.’ Sarah is always the first person to tell me to not do too much. Sometimes that’s hard to hear because nothing just falls into your lap; it takes hard work, but you have to ask yourself would you expect the same of someone else? I might expect a colleague to do long hours when it was necessary but not very often, so I try not to expect more of myself than I would of others.

When I do have to work long hours I make a deal with myself that I can do this for a week but next week I’ll need to change things because otherwise I’ll burn out. Part of the joy of working for yourself is doing what fulfils you and that changes day by day. Most of all I want to feel happy, to me nowadays that is what success feels like.

SarahBeeson_OurCountryNurse_TwitterBanner_New

Amy Beeson runs Wordsby Communications and has a successful writing partnership with her mum Sarah Beeson MBE. Their new book Our Country Nurse is set in a country village in 1975 and is bursting with stories of mums journeys during pregnancy and motherhood.

sarah_tries_to_make_rachael_laugh

You can spoil babies you know (No you can’t!) How many out of these Ten parenting myths have you heard?

Sarah shares some of the myths parents were told in the 1970s that they’re still being told today with Female First.

Have you been told any of these Myths?

Myth One: You can’t get pregnant when breastfeeding
Myth Two: There’s no harm in leaving babies to cry themselves to sleep
Myth Three: All babies wean at six months
Myth Four: All women can have sex just six weeks after giving birth
Myth Five: You only get postnatal depression with a newborn baby
Myth Six: Babies can’t choke
Myth Seven: If your child bites it’s best if you bite them back
Myth Eight: We don’t need vitamin supplements
Myth Nine: When your child misbehaves putting them in the naughty corner will put a stop to it
Myth Ten: You can spoil babies

SarahBeeson_OurCountryNurse_TwitterBanner_New

Parenting expert and author Sarah Beeson MBE has worked with families for over four decades. Her latest book Our Country Nurse written with her daughter Amy Beeson, is set in a country village in 1975 and is bursting with stories of mums’ journeys during pregnancy and motherhood. Sarah shares some of the myths mums were told in the 1970s that they’re still being told today with Female First.