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Advice on games to play with your newborn baby

Parenting expert, author and health visitor Sarah Beeson MBE shares her top newborn baby games with Louisa Pritchard in this month’s Mother & Baby Magazine.

Newborn games

Name that tune-A baby often calms down to the music you played or sang while you were pregnant. See if she recognises the the tunes while you gently sway her in your arms.

Ring, ring, is that baby calling?- With your baby lying on her playmat, put her foot to your ear and pretend it’s a telephone. Have a chat with her on the ‘phone’ and lightly blow raspberries on the soles of her feet. This helps speech development . Plus, the gentle movement can also help alleviate trapped wind.

Who’s got the hat?- This is a lovely way to introduce your baby to visitors. Take one of the baby’s hats and put them on her head. Sing: “[Baby’s name] got the hat, now what do we think of that? She passes the hat to Mummy now Mummy’s got the hat.’ Put the hat on your head and repeat the song using your name and the name of a visitor. Pass the hat around the room and clap your hands in time to the song. Your little one will join in someday.

Follow the light- In a darkened room, shine a not-too-bright torch on the ceiling. Move the spot of light around and make up a story including the objects the light lands on. Your baby will enjoy following the light with her eyes and will learn about her surroundings.

Nude tummy time- Every now and then, try tummy time your baby nappy-free on a washable blanket with some toys in front of her. She’ll love the freedom.

What games do you like to play with your LO? Let us know which of these games they enjoy? Tweet @NewArrivalBook or Facebook us.

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Sarah Beeson MBE is a health visitor and author. Her new parenting book Happy Baby, Happy Family: Learning to trust yourself and enjoy your baby is published by HarperCollins (4 June 2015). You can read all about her nurse training in her memoir The New Arrival: the heartwarming true story of a trainee nurse in 1970s London. 

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